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Our pages are created to provide medically accurate information that is intended to complement, not replace or substitute in any way the services of your physician. Any application of the recommendations set forth in the following pages is at the reader's discretion and sole risk. Before undergoing medical treatment, you should consult with your doctor, who can best assess your individual needs, symptoms and treatment. 

COOKING MEAT AND MEATLESS ALTERNATIVES

COOKING METHODS FOR MEAT AND MEATLESS ALTERNATIVES

1. Choose lean cuts of meat. Trim all visible fat and remove poultry skin before cooking.
2. Use cooking methods such as broiling, poaching, baking, barbecuing, boiling, microwaving and roasting on a rack that allows fat to drip away from meat. If using lean ground beef, medium hamburger for spaghetti sauces, etc., brown meat first, discard fat and proceed with recipe. 
3. Select more fish, poultry and meatless alternatives. Try to include at least two fish meals per week. When canned fish is selected, fish packed in water or broth is the best choice. 
4. To make low fat gravy, sauces and stews, refrigerate first, them skim fat from surface. Faster method: skim off fat, add ice cubes to liquid and skim fat again.
5. Meatless meals include low fat cheese, egg substitutes, peanut butter, legumes, and tofu. To make your protein complete combine a legume with cereal or low fat dairy product to egg substitute or egg white or pasta. 
6. "Remember" egg yolk, organ meats and shrimp have a HIGH cholesterol content.
Changing what you eat and method of food preparation can reduce significantly your blood cholesterol level. If the cholesterol level does not come down after a few months, your physician may recommend a much stricter diet. If, despite your honest efforts, you must take medication, your good eating habits may let you reduce the quantity.

One serving of meat equals 1 oz. (cooked weight, no bones or fat) or 25 grams.
Meat supplies protein and iron but you only need small amounts for your daily protein requirement. By cutting down on the amount eaten daily, you avoid the major source of saturated fat and cholesterol.
Meatless Alternatives
are good sources of protein, and are low in fat and cholesterol.
Browse Other Related Topics:
MEAT AND MEATLESS ALTERNATIVES
MILK PRODUCTS
FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
BREAD AND CEREAL FOODS
FATS AND OILS
SUGAR AND SWEETS
ALCOHOL
RECIPE SUBSTITUTIONS
EATING WELL
ABOUT FATS
FAT FACTS
FAT SCOREBOARD
ANTIOXIDANTS
FOOD GUIDE
CHOLESTEROL CONTENT OF COMMONLY USED FOODS
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