Our pages are created to provide medically accurate information that is intended to complement, not replace or substitute in any way the services of your physician. Any application of the recommendations set forth in the following pages is at the reader's discretion and sole risk. Before undergoing medical treatment, you should consult with your doctor, who can best assess your individual needs, symptoms and treatment. 

LOW FAT DIET
Changing what you eat and method of food preparation can reduce significantly your blood cholesterol level. If the cholesterol level does not come down after a few months, your physician may recommend a much stricter diet. If, despite your honest efforts, you must take medication, your good eating habits may let you reduce the quantity.
Meat and Meatless Alternatives - Meat supplies protein and iron but you only need small amounts for your daily protein requirement. By cutting down on the amount eaten daily, you avoid the major source of saturated fat and cholesterol. Cooking Methods for Meat and Meatless Alternatives
Milk Products - Whole milk dairy products are high in fat and cholesterol. We encourage the use of low fat dairy products which are low in fat and cholesterol but provide a good source of protein, calcium, and vitamin D. 
Fruits and Vegetables - These foods provide fibre, vitamin C and vitamin A. Fruits provide sugar and energy. Vegetables add variety and are low in calories. Chose raw fruits and vegetables more frequently than juices as these contain more fibre. Use fresh or frozen vegetables.
Bread & Cereal Foods - Foods from this group are low in fat and cholesterol. Whole grain breads and cereals (Oat bran, wheat bran) increase the fibre content of your diet and provide a good source of energy. Avoid baked goods, crackers, and cookies that are high in fat, sugar, and salt. (Many commercially baked goods are high in fat).
Fats and Oils - Poly and monounsaturated fats help you to lower your blood cholesterol levels. Even though you are using allowed fats, limit your intake because too much can cause weight gain. 
One serving of fat contains 45 calories.
Sugar and Sweets - These foods are low in fat but high in calories/kilojules.
If you have elevated triglyceride levels or elevated blood sugar, these foods should not be consumed unless approved by your physician or dietitian. Sugar substitutes and sweeteners are an acceptable alternative but should be used in moderation.
Alcohol in Low Fat Diet - Alcohol increases triglycerides; therefore, you should reduce or eliminate it from your diet.
Recipe Substitutions - Use our list for equivalent substitute.
About Fats - Learn more about fats.
Other Related Topics:
FAT FACTS
FAT SCOREBOARD
EATING WELL
ANTIOXIDANTS
FOOD GUIDE
CHOLESTEROL CONTENT OF COMMONLY USED FOODS
NOW YOU ARE COOKING
DIET AND EATING OUT
VISIT OUR COOKING PAGES
TRY SOME RECIPES FROM COOKING CHOICE
OUR OTHER HEALTH PAGES
Some fat in the diet is necessary for the good health. Fat is a major source of energy and essential fatty acids (fatty acids that cannot be produced by the body). Each teaspoon of fat = 4 grams of fat (36 Calories).

Cholesterol Books
Low Fat Diet
Prevent Heart Disease
About Triglycerides
Health Magazines
Medicine Books

ACHIEVE AND MAINTAIN A HEALTHY WEIGHT

Excess weight, especially in the abdominal region, can cause your blood cholesterol to rise. If you are overweight, a balanced, low-calorie, low-fat diet combined with an adequate amount of exercise will help you achieve and maintain a healthy weight.
For a heart healthier way of living, in addition to eating well, pursue regular physical activity, avoid smoking, and keep stress in check.

EAT LESS FAT, ESPECIALLY SATURATED FAT

A diet rich in fat, especially saturated fat, is one of the factors that contribute significantly to increasing blood cholesterol. Cutting down on fat, padicularly saturated fat, is by far the most important step in changing your eating habits. Saturated fats are found mainly in foods of animal origin such as meat, poultry and unskimmed dairy products. They are also found in so-called tropical oils like palm & coconut oil and  in hydrogenated vegetable fats like shortening and margarine.